Wellington Trust’s temporary exhibition: Abandon Ship!

The Wellington Trust is a charity established to support the historic ship, the HQS Wellington, moored on the Thames since 1948. With a focus on the history of the Merchant Navy and plans to develop the existing collections into a formal museum, the Trust has been presenting temporary exhibitions for the past few years. It has been awarded a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to develop an exhibition and events programme between May and November 2017, exploring the experiences of Merchant Navy sailors in the First & Second World Wars.

There are a range of roles on the Wellington Trust’s temporary exhibition, Abandon Ship!, which is currently in development. There are opportunities to research and write exhibition texts, to present mini lectures, or be involved in stewarding the exhibition or developing informal learning workshops and events.

This opportunity would be particularly suitable for students with an interest in maritime history, heritage engagement, and museum studies.

Click here for more details: Abandon Ship

THE HISTORY OF BRITISH PRISON HULKS, 1776-1864

Caird Library Research Seminars Programme 2017
A series of seminars convened by the Greenwich Maritime Centre and the National Maritime Museum

27th MARCH

Anna McKay
Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD student

THE HISTORY OF BRITISH PRISON HULKS, 1776-1864

The history of British prison hulks has been largely overlooked, despite the fact that they housed two types of inmate; prisoners of war and convicts. Furthermore, their image as ‘hell on water’ has undermined our understanding of these floating prisons as lived experiences. With reference to NMM collections, this paper will examine regime, defiance and productivity on board the hulks, ultimately restoring the lives of prisoners to their complex history.

MORE INFO: http://www.gre.ac.uk/ach/gmc/seminar-series

ALL SEMINARS ARE ON MONDAYS HELD BETWEEN 15:30 and 16:30

THE CAIRD LIBRARY, SAMMY OFER WING,

NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

GREENWICH, LONDON SE10 9NF

NO BOOKING NECESSARY!

Caird Library Research Seminars Programme 2017

The 2017 programme series has now been confirmed! The full programme will be uploaded shortly but we can announce the first seminar of the year:

27th FEBRUARY

Katherine Gazzard

Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD student

SELLING ‘SHADES’ BY THE SEA SHORE: PORTRAITURE IN 18TH CENTURY NAVAL PORTS

From Grandiose oil paintings by Joshua Reynolds to rapid cut-paper silhouettes and intricate miniatures, a diverse variety of portraits were produced in naval ports over the course of the 18th century. This seminar will explore examples of these artworks and the businesses of their producers, revealing how naval officers used portraiture to negotiate the emotional demands of their profession while on duty and when preparing to sail.

ALL SEMINARS ARE ON MONDAYS HELD BETWEEN 15:30 and 16:30

THE CAIRD LIBRARY, SAMMY OFER WING,

NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM

GREENWICH, LONDON SE10 9NF

NO BOOKING NECESSARY!

For further information please contact the Research Administrator on 020 8312 6716 or email: research@rmg.co.uk

GMC Featured Artist: Theo Crutchley-Mack

At regular intervals through the year the GMC will feature artists whose work relates to maritime issues. Art can be a powerful way of communicating. It tells a story that words alone cannot. One of the aims of the GMC is to help people ‘see the sea’ – to see and appreciate its multiple personalities and uses. Art can inspire, provoke, move and excite. Through the GMS’s Featured Artist initiative, and exhibitions we hold, we hope to connect people with our oceans and seas.

Our current Featured Artist is Theo Crutchley-Mack and you can find his full page with more of his works, his relationship with maritime issues, and further links here.

“Theo Crutchley-Mack was born in Bristol in 1994 and has lived in various parts of the UK including West Yorkshire, West Wales and South Cornwall. At the age of 16 he became the first teenager to design a 50 pence coin for the Royal Mint which was later released into circulation throughout the United Kingdom. This sparked a specific interest in drawing which has driven his visual journey through to the current day. Theo went on to pursue this interest and studied BA (Hons) Drawing at Falmouth University in Cornwall.”

j217-milford-acrylic-collage-70x54cm-2016

(C) Theo Crutchley-Mack 2016

 

Our previous, and first, featured artist was Vince Bevan and you can find his work here.

Thank you.

The Greenwich Maritime Centre.

 

Don’t forget to follow the GMC on social media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greenwichmaritimecentre

Twitter: https://twitter.com/GMC_Greenwich/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/greenwich-maritime-centre

Google+: https://plus.google.com/102828613261540841797

Become a GMC Affiliate!

Our aim at the GMC is to be inclusive to anyone interested in maritime issues. We therefore invite anyone to become a GMC Affiliated Member.

By becoming an Affiliated Member, you will receive more than just our blog posts… you will receive up-to-date information about the GMC (including our newsletter), maritime news, local and international events, opportunities in teaching (such as scholarships, internships and prizes) and research (e.g. collaboration opportunities), and more. You will become part of a vibrant network of people working in maritime issues, offering you opportunities to make new connections and broaden your understanding of maritime affairs.

If you would like to become an Affiliated Member, please either complete this online form:

http://eepurl.com/cm5Foj

or contact the GMC directly at gmc@gre.ac.uk.

Royal Naval Hydrography and Marine Surveying, 1830-50

You are cordially invited to our next Greenwich Maritime Research Seminar, run in conjunction with the National Maritime Museum

Wednesday, 30th November 2016, 4pm-5pm

University of Greenwich, QA065  

by

Megan Barford, Curator of Cartography, National Maritime Museum

Royal Naval Hydrography and Marine Surveying, 1830-50

This paper will examine writing, record keeping, printing and publishing practices in and around the Hydrographic Office of the Admiralty, c.1830-50. In particular, it will explore the increasingly administrated nature of state hydrography, which in turn enables a better understanding of the key impulse in the field at this time: to provide ever-updated charts of ever–changing coastlines, in keeping with ideas of improvement which permeated 19th century discourse in many areas.

For more information please visit: http://www.gre.ac.uk/ach/gmc/seminar-series 

GMRS Cover