National Maritime ‘The Big Skills Debate’

November 8 @ 5:30 pm8:00 pm

at the University of Greenwich, London.

 

The National Maritime ‘BIG SKILLS DEBATE‘ is delivered in partnership with Jobs in Maritime, the Greenwich Maritime Centre (GMC) and the Shipbuilders and Shiprepairers Association (SSA). The event further supports our work around, encouraging and developing closer collaboration between all industries within the UK maritime cluster to drive economic growth.

The debates Chairperson:

  • Andrew Bull, Headmaster, The London Nautical School.

The panel:

  • Tony Graham, Chairman, The UK Naval Engineering Science and Technology Forum (UKNEST)
  • Peter Aylott, Chairman, Education and Training, The Honourable Company of Master Mariners (HCMM)
  • Susan Potter, HC Development Manager, DP World London Gateway
  • Sally Atkinson, Project Manager, Parkol Marine Engineering Limited
  • James Burr, Head of Human Resources, MBNA Thames Clippers
  • Dr Christopher Ware, MA Programme lead International Maritime Policy., Greenwich Maritime Centre
  • Ben Willows, Chief Executive, UKSA

The expert panel represents UK maritime cluster interests in naval design and engineering, the merchant navy, port operations, fisheries, shipbuilding, inland waterways and education.

The debate will explore how corporates, entrepreneurs and governments currently collaborate to deliver maritime training that best supports business succession planning, it will challenge existing UK maritime training provision and funding streams and take the opportunity to consider how the national ‘skills gap’ discussion can be simplified to encourage wider participation and collaboration from across the UK maritime cluster. The format will be a 90 minute panel debate (BBC Question Time panel delivery). The event includes a drinks reception.

Event Registration: 17.30 hrs

Cost:

£20 + VAT for National Maritime SSA members

£25 + VAT for Non-Members

For more details or to purchase your ticket please visit https://www.nmdg.co.uk/events/national-maritime-big-skills-debate or email peter.green@nmdg.co.uk

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‘State of Maritime History Research’ Conference Report

The GMC is pleased to announce that the ‘State of Maritime History Research’ conference, held in partnership with the Society for Nautical Research (SNR), was a resounding success.

On 9 September 2017, we welcomed over 70 delegates to the first maritime history conference hosted by the GMC, and the first national conference organised by the SNR. The SNR supports maritime history events in conjunction with other organisations, such as the New Researchers in Maritime History conference and the King’s Lecture series, co-sponsored with the British Commission for Maritime History. Although a half-day conference in Glasgow in 2010 to celebrate the SNR’s centenary developed into the Annual Scottish Maritime History Conference held with the University of Glasgow and Glasgow Museums, this was the first time they held a full one day event under their own flag. At the same time, the GMC wanted a conference for alumni of the former Greenwich Maritime Institute. Both organisations also sought to attract those who write maritime history but who don’t identify as maritime historians. This conference was the result.

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With the theme of ‘The State of Maritime Research’, it was befitting that the first SNR Anderson Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to long-time member John Hattendorf, Professor Emeritus of Maritime History, U.S. Naval War College. Prof Hattendorf has for a long time been a keen observer and prolific writer on developments in naval and maritime history. In answer to the conference’s key question about the future of maritime history he answered in the affirmative. Maritime history is in a healthy state, with at least nine maritime history journals: ‘a field with so many active journals seems to be one that is vibrant’. He suggests there is ‘great future potential’, and to ‘Let’s all get to work and keep maritime history under-weigh with way on!’

The tone was set perfectly for the rest of the conference. Keynotes by our other master naval historians, Prof Eric Grove and Prof Richard Harding, also set the bar high by sharing their experiences with incorporating broad perspectives. Prof Grove regaled us with an ‘aha’ moment, which came from watching a programme on food history. This changed the way he interpreted the U-boat crisis of 1917. He advised that we can’t understand battles and war without seeing the bigger picture, such as the importance of logistics and food production.

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Prof Richard Harding, our last keynote of the day, had a similar message. Maritime history is robust and diverse, and yet offers even more opportunities for research. The field is multi-functional, multi-disciplinary; it helps us to understand the global condition and organizational problems. This is especially true when maritime history connects with other approaches, such as the social sciences. He emphasised as well, that the field’s strength lies in its breadth of practitioners—both professional and amateur. Indeed, our amateur researchers are our bedrock.

The papers presented at the conference supported the points made in all three keynotes. They were wide-ranging, and all offered exciting new avenues for research. Indeed, one of the themes of the conference was the importance of reaching out, to bring together academics, independent scholars, heritage organisations, museums, and the interested public. We all need each other.

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All-in-all, the feedback for the conference was very positive, and the excitement was palpable. One delegate remarked on Twitter that “I had a great day, thanks for the kick start to my MA studies. Am one of the enthusiastic amateurs mentioned in round table!” It wasn’t long before the organisers heard the comments of ‘Let’s do this again!’

I think we all took away an appreciation for the vibrancy and positive future of maritime history. We really do have an embarrassment of riches considering the topics and methods we can choose from, and potential impact of our research. The field is in good hands.

If you didn’t get to attend, conference organiser JD Davies has written an engaging blog at https://jddavies.com/2017/09/11/a-very-palpable-hit-the-state-of-maritime-historical-research-conference-2017/ which describes individual papers.  Tweets from the conference can be viewed by searching on #MarConf17 on Twitter. The SNR is also planning on publishing many of the papers in Topmasts, which will be available open-source online. Check out their website at https://snr.org.uk/.

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One last comment—but a very important one: The organisers offer their gratitude to the University of Greenwich for hosting the conference, as well as to the Events team for all their help in set-up, registration, catering, and taking care of the delegates. We couldn’t have done it without you.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – The State of Maritime History Research

CALL FOR PAPERS

University of Greenwich, 9 September 2017

Over the past few decades there has been significant debate as to the place and shape of maritime history. In January 2008, the Council of the American Historical Association approved unanimously to add ‘Maritime, including Naval’ to its taxonomy of academic specialties. But since then, it has been suggested that the field has been marginalised.  Or does the growth of new areas of interest – such as the study of port towns, the ‘Atlantic World,’ Coastal History, and the role of gender in maritime history – suggest a flourishing, if more diverse, environment? What is the state of health in other research-orientated maritime activities such as public history and heritage?

The Greenwich Maritime Centre and the Society for Nautical Research are excited to announce a major conference to be held at the University of Greenwich to consider these questions. The conference will bring together key contributors from within the broad field of maritime history, as well as those who write on maritime and coastal topics, but do not consider themselves maritime historians. Papers and key discussion points will be published in hard copy and/or online by the Society of Nautical Research.

Proposals are invited for papers on any of the following aspects, or on other related and relevant themes. The principal criterion for acceptance will be the extent to which a paper provides a broad overview of the current situation in a specific field, and of the prospects for the future, rather than narrow, descriptive accounts of a particular period of history or historic ship (to give two examples).

  • The study of maritime history in the university and school sectors
  • The state of maritime research in particular geographical regions and countries
  • The state of particular sub-disciplines within maritime history and research, e.g. naval history, nautical archaeology, port towns, coastal studies
  • The health of the maritime museums sector, and current and future challenges for it
  • The state of the historic ships and craft sector
  • ‘Sea blindness’: fact or fiction?

Proposals of 500 words, together with a short biography of no more than 150 words, should be submitted by 1 June 2017  to  https://tinyurl.com/SNRConference2017

NB: There will be a nominal fee of £25 for the conference. Please book  at  https://maritimeresearch.eventbrite.co.uk/, registration will open on 1 June 2017.

Rendez-Vous 2017 Tall Ships Regatta

Last week saw the arrival of the Tall Ships festival in Greenwich. The University of Greenwich hosted a stand at the festival, held within our campus at the Old Royal Naval College, and here are a few photographs.

You can find out more information about the Tall Ships Festival here.

Society and the Sea Conference – Thank you!

Society and the Sea Conference

15-16 September 2016

University of Greenwich, Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London, UK

The 1st Greenwich Maritime Conference ‘Society and the Sea’ was a great success. There were 36 presentations representing a diverse range of maritime issues across conservation, fisheries, arts, history, health and wellbeing and the blue economy. Many thanks to all the delegates who took part and in particular to the five keynote speakers, the presenters and the session chairs. Thanks to all for making it such a worthwhile event. Final thanks goes to the excellent organisation skills of the University of Greenwich FACH Research Office for going the extra mile and making sure everything ran smoothly and also to the Trafalgar Tavern for a fantastic and memorable conference dinner.

Keynote presentations, abstracts and photos from the event will be uploaded to this blog and the conference website soon!

(http://www.gre.ac.uk/society-and-the-sea)

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Glen O’Hara talk on ‘The Fight against Seaborne, Oil and Beach Pollution in Post-War Britain’, 19th May

Glen O’Hara, author of Britain and the Sea since 1600 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), is coming to Greenwich on talk about ‘The Fight against Seaborne, Oil and Beach Pollution in Post-War Britain’.

Date: Thursday 19 May 2016 at 6.00 pm.

Venue: University of Greenwich, Room QA 075 (Edinburgh Room), Queen Anne Court Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, London SE10 9LS.

The talk is free – you can register at Eventbrite or just turn up.

‘The Fight against Seaborne, Oil and Beach Pollution in Post-War Britain:

Pollution was not a high priority in the first years after the Second World War. Britain’s coastline and estuaries were often littered with wartime detritus: many inshore and inland waters were highly polluted or indeed toxic and lifeless. Biodiversity and levels of marine life had both fallen rapidly in many areas. A mix of austerity and localism meant that concerted action was almost impossible. But the damage done by the east coast floods of 1953, pressure exerted by increasingly-popular pressure groups pushing for better access to safer amenities, and the shock of oil disasters such as the wreck of the Torrey Canyon in 1967, helped created a new, integrated and urgent sense of ‘the environment’. This involved both accounting for and addressing the manifold dangers of Britain’s polluted seas, and began the long centrally-directed cleanup that continues into the twenty-first century.

 

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Photo: Oil covered shells,  International Maritime Organization ©. Reproduced from Flickr under a Creative Commons Licence .

Glen O’Hara is Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Oxford Brookes University. He is the author of Britain and the Sea since 1600 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). For further information about Glen, please go to http://www.social-sciences.brookes.ac.uk/People/Academic/prof.asp?ID=600. Follow him on Twitter @gsoh31

This talk is part of the History & Environment series presented by the Raphael Samuel History Centre in conjunction with the University of Greenwich, Dept of History, Politics and Social Sciences. This year’s series theme is Britain and the Sea. To find out more about the RSHC History and Environment Seminars in general, please contact George Yerby george.yerby@googlemail.com. For more information on these Greenwich RHSC seminars, please contact: Vanessa Taylor V.J.Taylor@greenwich.ac.uk

Greenwich Maritime Research Seminars

Don’t forget to come along to the Greenwich Maritime Research Seminars convened by the Greenwich Maritime Centre and the National Maritime Museum.

 

GMRS Cover

 

The next talk is:

Wednesday 27th April 2016

4pm-5pm

National Maritime Museum, Seminar Room 

by

Dr Michael Talbot, University of Greenwich

‘To protect the coasts from pirate brigands’: Ottoman anti-piracy measures in the Eastern Mediterranean, 1718-70

 

This paper will examine the development of deterrent and protective naval patrols by the Ottoman navy in the Aegean and Levant seas against domestic pirates, Maltese corsairs, and European privateers. These were partly in response to demands for  protection from Ottoman provincial subjects and partly due to a developing sense of maritime territoriality.